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  1. Modeling a Downstand Beam Without Fixed Connection

    Modeling Downstand Beam Without Fixed Connection

    Problem

    As a supplementary support of a floor slab you want to enter a downstand beam in RFEM to which only vertical compressive forces are transferred. Defining a rib or an eccentric member whose system line lies within the surface plane is not correct because member element and slab would be rigidly connected with each other in every finite element. But if you model the downstand beam at the level of its centroid, no connection will exist between member and surface.

  2. Background Knowledge for Definition of Effective Slab Width Used for T-beams

    Background Knowledge for Definition of Effective Slab Width Used for T-beams

    When you define the effective slab width of floor beams, the following three options are available for selection in RFEM (L = member length):

    • L/6
    • L/8
    • effective width per side
  3. Linear and Quadratic Taper Shape

    Linear and Quadratic Taper Shape

    Right-click a member to open its context menu. Then, select ‘Edit Member’ to open the edit dialog box with the dialog tab ‘Options’. In the lower right corner, you find the option ‘Taper Shape’. Choose between linear or quadratic application. Settings affect the interpolation of the cross‑sectional area and the second moments of area for the determination of stiffnesses along the member length, and consequently of deformations and internal forces.

  4. Settings for Layout of Longitudinal Reinforcement

    Dimensioning of Longitudinal Reinforcement for Serviceability Limit State Design 2

    In Part 1, we have described the selection of layout criteria for dimensioning reinforcement for the serviceability limit state design in RF‑CONCRETE Members and CONCRETE. Now, we go into detail for the function ‘Find economical reinforcement for crack width design’.

  5. Settings for Layout of Longitudinal Reinforcement

    Dimensioning of Longitudinal Reinforcement for Serviceability Limit State Design 1

    In RF-CONCRETE Members and CONCRETE and you have the option for ‘Dimensioning of Longitudinal Reinforcement for Serviceability Limit State’. You can select the layout criteria for the calculation of the longitudinal reinforcement in a details dialog box.

  6. Modeling a Plug-in Connection

    Modeling Plug-in Connection

    If you want to calculate the global load bearing capacity of a telescoping boom, for example of a construction machine with members, a special modeling technique with regard to structural connections as shown in the sketch may be useful because of its telescope mechanics.

  7. Defining Link Spacings

    User-Defined Link Spacings

    To cover the required transverse reinforcement, RF‑CONCRETE Members and CONCRETE determine the most cost-efficient transverse reinforcement as reinforcement proposal in accordance with the predefined link diameter. Often, the results of such a determining process are irregular distances between links which cannot be built in at construction sites.

  8. Simulation of Thermal Strains with Specification of Absolute Temperatures

    Simulation of Thermal Strains with Specification of Absolute Temperatures

    The structural analysis programs RFEM and RSTAB are able to simulate a thermal strain of structural components by means of temperature loads. The temperature loads are subdivided, because global changes in the temperature of structural components involve a membrane effect, and because temperature changes in relation to the height of structural components implicate bending effects. Temperature load application is now divided into the following two types.

  9. Fire Protection Design According to DIN EN 1993-1-2 (Eurocode 3)

    Fire Protection Design According to DIN EN 1993-1-2 (Eurocode 3)

    The RF-/STEEL EC3 add‑on module for RFEM and RSTAB allows for the fire protection design of structural steel components. The simplified analysis is performed by determining the steel temperature iteratively for a particular point of time. Currently, you can apply three different fire situations for the temperature determination.

  10. Creating Lateral Intermediate Supports

    Creating Lateral Intermediate Supports

    In RF-/STEEL EC3, the Window 1.4 Lateral Intermediate Supports offers you the option to define lateral intermediate supports at individual members. These supports are created from connected purlins and horizontal beams, for example, and increase the resistance against lateral-torsional buckling. Lateral intermediate supports can be entered either with a relative or an absolute distance.

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